Wine Lovers around the world rejoice, Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrivé!

The harvest is in and it's a race from grape to glass. Half the fun of this annual event is knowing that on the same night, in homes, cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and bistros around the world the same celebration is taking place.

Celebrate the end of harvest at TasteVin!

Kermit Lynch is air lifting our shipment, 2016 Domaine Dupeuble, from Beaujolais, France.

The Domaine Dupeuble Winey is located in the hamlet of Le Breuil, deep in the southern Beaujolais and perched above a narrow creek and has been running almost continuously since 1512. The wines of Dupeuble represent some of the best values in the Beaujolais today and are widely regarded for their very high quality and eminently reasonable price.

We uncork the first bottle at 5:00 pm. We can't wait to taste the harvest.

Chef Cynthia is creating a special bistro dish to pair, Duck and French green lentils.

Mangez bien, riez souvent, aimez beaucoup."Eat well, laugh often, love abundantly." 

 

About Beaujolais Nouveau Day -

Beaujolais Nouveau Day is marked in France on the third Thursday in November with fireworks, music and festivals. Under French law, the wine is released at 12:01 a.m., just weeks after the wine's grapes have been harvested. Parties are held throughout the country and further afield to celebrate the first wine of the season

There are about 120 Beaujolais Nouveau related festivals held in the Beaujolais region.

The most famous —Les Sarmentelles—is held in the town of Beaujeu, the capital of the Beaujolais region. Kicking off in the early evening the day before Beaujolais Nouveau, the five-day festival features wine tasting, live music and dancing. During the afternoon on Beaujolais Nouveau Day, a heated tent offers wine and a range of local foods for visitors to sample. There is also a tasting contest featuring all of the twelve kinds of Beaujolais, in which the winner nets his or her weight in Beaujolais-Villages. In the evening, a torch lit parade honours the farmers that made the wine. Fireworks at midnight mark the release of the new wine, which is then drank until dawn.

Beaujolais Nouveau is meant to be drunk young. Most vintages should be consumed by the following May after its release. However, in excellent vintages (such as 2000) the wine can live much longer and can be enjoyed until the next harvest rolls around.

The region of Beaujolais is known for its fabulous food. The famed Paul Bocuse restaurant is just minutes from the heart of Beaujolais, as is Georges Blanc’s. These great restaurants have plenty of Beaujolais Nouveau on their wine lists. The wine goes well with either haute cuisine or Friday night’s pizza.

Beaujolais Nouveau – that much-ballyhooed cherry-red colored vintage that’s best served chilled -- is clearly not for wine snobs. This fresh and fruity red is the result of a quick fermentation process that ends up with a tasty, clean wine that is enjoyed by palates the world over.

The Gamay grapes that go into Beaujolais Nouveau are handpicked in the Beaujolais province of France. The wine actually originated about a century ago as a cheap and cheerful drink produced by locals to celebrate the end of the harvest season.

Perhaps the most well-known producer of Beaujolais Nouveau is Georges Duboeuf, who is credited as one of the marketing geniuses behind the wine. Selling this young red was viewed by some vintners as a means to clear large quantities of wine at decent profits, which would create a much-needed cash flow shortly after harvest.

The idea of a race to Paris carrying the first bottles of the new vintage was conceived and this attracted much media attention. By the 1970s, the race became a national event. The races spread to neighbouring countries in Europe in the 1980s, followed by North America, and in the 1990s, to Asia.

Courtesy of www.beaujolaisnouveauday.com/